Tag Archives: Pool in winter

Main types of pool algae

During the months of July and August, algae can be a very big problem for swimming pool owners. With owners often avoiding their pools during the colder month’s inconsistency in a pool’s sanitizer levels often change and algae can appear. The different types of algae can be found below.

About Algae

Algae is a single-celled plant form. It utilizes the process of photosynthesis to manufacture its own food and comes in very wide variety of colors and forms making it adaptable to almost any condition. Due to algae’s microscopic size, it takes literally millions of these plants to accumulate to be noticed by the naked eye.

Green Algae

The most common form of algae in swimming pools is “green” algae.  Green algae (varies in color from blue-green to yellow-green to dark-green) can be free floating in the water (turning the water a hazy-green) or can be wall-clinging (patches of green). Green algae can be treated fairly simply with the right amount of brushing, shocking, and algaecide.

Treatment:  Have water properly analyzed to ensure PH is at proper levels and balance the pool water. Pools treated with chlorine should be brushed thoroughly, then shocked, raising the chlorine levels above 30,000 ppm.  Also, add a strong dose of Algaecide 60 to the water. Continue to check the pool’s filtration throughout this process to ensure proper water flow. You may have to repeat this process a few times in order to completely eradicate the algae.

Black Algae

“Black Algae” (actually blue-green algae) forms in cracks and crevices on pool surfaces, especially plaster finishes. Black algae normally grows in shady areas of the pool. Black algae is more typically found in concrete or plaster finished pools because of their rough surfaces. It is known for a heavy slime layer and “skeletal growths” that make it impervious to normal chlorine levels.  Black algae usually doesn’t have any effect on water clarity, it just makes your pool appear to have black spots on the surface.

Treatment:  Have water properly analyzed and balanced. Prior to and during treatment, the algae MUST be thoroughly brushed in order to “break open” the slime layer.  Failure to do this critical step will prevent the treatment from working.  Shock the pool very aggressively and continue to brush the black algae. Add substantial amounts of algaecide 60.

Mustard Algae

Mustard algae is a chlorine-resistant form of green algae (yellow-green to brown in color). It often resembles dirt or sand on the bottom or sides of a pool.

Treatment:  Same as black algae.

In certain cases, when a pool is full of algae, the algae must be vacuumed directly out of the pool. This can be accomplished by brushing the algae off the walls, then adding a ‘floc’ to the water, which coagulates the algae and causes it to settle. Once it settles, it should vacuumed directly out of the pool. When attempting to floc a pool, follow the directions on the bottle very carefully.

Good luck and happy swimming!

 

 

 

 

Originally posted: http://www.riverpoolsandspas.com/blog/bid/24528/How-to-Identify-Treat-and-Remove-Algae-in-Your-Swimming-Pool
Child

Help your kids to love swimming!

Help Your Kids Learn to Love Swimming!

Thinking about introducing your child to the fun of water play? Before hitting the pool or the beach, be sure to read our tips for helping your child feel comfortable.

Get In the Swim!

Ready for some water fun? Read on for step-by-step plan for helping babies, toddlers, and preschoolers learn to love swimming, plus expert advice on the right time for starting classes and how to pick the perfect program.

Step One: Test the Waters

The best way to get your child familiar with the water is to start in the bathtub or kiddie pool once he can confidently sit up on his own (typically around 6 months). “Having this experience in a calm, happy place will help your child stay relaxed in the more chaotic environment of a public pool or beach,” explains Connie Harvey, project manager for aquatics technical development at the American Red Cross. To help your baby grow comfortable with getting his face wet, gently squeeze a sponge or a washcloth over his head, letting the (soap-free) water trickle down his forehead and into his eyes.

More Ways to Make It Fun

Turn the tub into a playground: Bring in his favorite playthings like floating toys, watering cans, and plastic balls. Having the stuff he loves around him will make the water a welcoming place for your child.

Play peekaboo: Submerge your face in the water, then come up with a bright smile. Children are natural mimics; if you show that it’s fun to get your face wet, your little one will be more willing to try it later on.

Blow on it: Put your lips to the water and make some bubbles. If your child is up for it, you can then have him copy your moves with his mouth and nose submerged too.

Step Two: Get Your Feet Wet

The pool can be overwhelming for little kids. “To make that first dip less scary, take your toddler to a family-swim period so she can observe the action without pressure to join in,” suggests Kay Smiley, who oversees swim-program development for the YMCA of the USA. On your next trip, sit together on the side of the pool, letting her feet dangle in the water. Then go into the shallow end together, holding your child with one hand underneath her bottom, and the other one around her back. Ease in gradually, and act relaxed. Once she’s comfortable, get her used to moving through the water by front towing: Hold her under her arms, facing you, allowing the water to support her weight as you walk slowly backward, chatting with her the whole time.

More Ways to Make It Fun

Go for a ride: Hold your child by the armpits as you walk backwards through the water, chanting, “Motorboat, motorboat, go so slow.” Pick up the pace, then say, “Motorboat, motorboat, go so fast. Motorboat, motorboat, step on the gas.” In time, encourage her to kick.

Walk it off: Get her used to being in the water without you supporting her completely by holding her bottom as she grasps the ledge of the pool and walks hand over hand along the side (to make it more fun, call it “monkey walking” and have her make silly monkey sounds).

Make a wish: Work on bubble-blowing and breath-control skills by pretending your finger is a birthday candle. Have your child blow on it, gradually moving your finger closer to the water until she makes a few bubbles.

Step Three: Start Splashing!

Around age 3 or 4, when your child feels at home in the pool, you can begin to prepare him for formal lessons. First, practice floating: With your child’s stomach in the water, position yourself so you’re cheek to cheek, then have him extend his legs behind him and take a “nap” on the water with his head resting on your shoulder (the “pillow”). Have him do the same thing on his back once he’s ready. You can also have him latch on to your neck, using your arms to straighten his legs out behind him and help him kick.

More Ways to Make It Fun

Sound off: Encourage him to put his face in the water if he hasn’t already; the first time he tries it, have him close his mouth and hum to prevent water from going up his nose.

Talk to the fishies: Prime your little one for learning the rhythmic breathing that goes with strokes: Prompt him to blow a few bubbles by suggesting that he put his face in the water and ask an imaginary fish a question. Then have him turn to the left or the right, keeping his ear in the water so he can listen to what the fish has to say. Keep up the pattern of bubble blowing and then side breathing by feeding him questions for the fish, such as, “What do fish like to eat?”

Sneak in some practice: Play a few rounds of “Simon Says” in the shallow end, and instruct your little one to kick and blow bubbles — in addition to goofier commands for splashing (just a little) and shaking his hands while tapping his feet.

Download the guide here: Pool Shop: Help Your Children Love Swimming

 

Originally published in the June 2010 issue of Parents magazine.

http://www.parents.com/baby/safety/outdoor/help-your-kids-learn-to-love-swimming/

Benefits of Swimming

Swimming is a healthy, low-cost activity that you can continue throughout your life. Swimming is a low-impact activity that has many physical and mental health benefits. Swimming is a great workout because you need to move your whole body against the resistance of the water.

The attached pdf document outlines some of the benefits of swimming and has been been reproduced from the Victorian Governments Better Health Channel.
View the PDF here: Pool Shop Swimming

Reference: www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Tips to protect your pool for Winter

The days have started to feel colder, temperatures are definitely lower than a few weeks ago… this doesn’t only have an effect on you and your choices of wardrobe, it also effects your pool!

So here are some tips for you to protect your pool and get it ready for winter.

1) Clean the filters – Your pool filters should be cleaned at least once a year. Why? It gets rid of those stubborn oils and debris that are missed during backwashing or hosing. Cleaning these filters will also improve its efficiency! Not sure what to clean it with? Try BioGuard’s Filter Brite.

2) Clean the exposed pool surfaces – those dirty marks and lines that build up over summer (around the water line) are an ideal food source for bacteria and algae. So make sure to remove them! You could try the BioGuard Sueaky Clean surface cleaner to do this.

3) Clean the pool skimmer box – Remove any debris from your pool and the skimmer box.

4) TEST – Have the water in your pool tested to make sure that it is balanced. We advise to get it professionally tested monthly during winter. See our website for more information on our FREE water testing services. Having the pool water correctly balanced isn’t just better for your health and skin but also means that your pool chemicals will be working more efficiently. Therefore, in order to not waste money, reduce the risk of damaging the surface and equipment of your pool it is vital to keep the water balanced.

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Hot tub spa in winter